Day by Day: Routines Cycle 1, Day 5

To see a complete list of the reflection activities and for an explanation of the program, visit my Day By Day Main Page.

Routines Cycle 1: Revving Up

Day 5: Communal Supplies

Challenge: Plan a classroom walk-through for your students that will support their independence with regard to knowing where materials are and how to access them.

What did your students learn about the way to access materials for writing workshop during the classroom tour?

How will you restock supplies when they run low? Will you have a student notify you or will you enlist your students’ assistance to replenish supplies?

What’s your plan if you notice your students aren’t properly caring for communal supplies?

Day by Day: Routines Cycle 1, Day 4

To see a complete list of the reflection activities and for an explanation of the program, visit my Day By Day Main Page.

Routines Cycle 1: Revving Up

Day 4: Getting Stuck and Working Through It

Challenge: Have students do a little writing about what they do when they get stuck during the writing process. Ask them what helps them get back on track. Then, using their reflections about how they’ve overcome challenging writing situations in the past, lead a class discussion wherein students discuss ways to overcome “getting stuck.”

How did the open forum you created help your students exchange ideas about independence in the writing workshop?

What did you learn about your students’ resilience with writing as a result of the discussion you lead?

How did speaking openly about the writing process, regarding the ways you get back on track, go with your students?

Day by Day: Routines Cycle 1, Day 3

To see a complete list of the reflection activities and for an explanation of the program, visit my Day By Day Main Page.

Routines Cycle 1: Revving Up

Day 3: Choice in Writing Process

Challenge: Consider the procedures you have in place to encourage students to work within their personalized writing process. Make changes to increase the opportunity for students to work according to their individual needs.

How do your current procedures help or hinder students in developing a personalized writing process?

Considering the previous bulleted list, which procedure would be most helpful to establish in your writing workshop?

Day by Day: Routines Cycle 1, Day 2

To see a complete list of the reflection activities and for an explanation of the program, visit my Day By Day Main Page.

Routines Cycle 1: Revving Up

Day 2: Creating a List of Classroom Expectations

Challenge: Develop a list of expectations for writing workshop with your students. Even if you’ve already created workshop rules, take some time to elicit student input about the expectations for writing workshop. Post these expectations in a prominent place in the classroom.

I’ve dedicated a part of our room to be a writing workshop resource center / writing space. I have two computers set up, as well as a table and a bookshelf with all necessary writing supplies (paper, pencils, big erasers, dictionaries, with more to come as I introduce the items). I’m definitely going to need to set up expectations around that space. Otherwise, I plan for our rules to look much like the charts we use to guide our behavior in Daily 5, which includes Work on Writing.

What are your nonnegotiable expectations for writing workshop?

  • Have a plan for the whole writing time.
  • Write/revise the whole time.

How can you boil these expectations down to something general for students in order to start a discussion?

Again, I think that the “something general” will be our usual expectations from Daily 5 (work the whole time, get started right away, build stamina, etc).

How did creating a list of expectations differ from creating a list of classroom rules with your students?

Classroom rules can seem a bit more concrete — the look-fors are more cut-and-dry. I anticipate that we’ll have to have conversations about writing versus “fake writing” much like we have at the beginning of the year in reading.

 

Day by Day Main Post

This year, I’ll be studying writing workshop and reflecting on my practice using Day by Day, by Ruth Ayres and Stacey Shubitz. From this page, you should be able to access my posts for each chapter and each cycle.

I went one cycle at a time, so please note that all chapter 1 cycles won’t be complete, for example, until close to the end of the year. Please join me, and comment as you see fit!

Chapter 1: Routines

  • Cycle 1: Revving Up (August 29 – September 9)
  • Cycle 2: Writer’s Notebooks (November 21 – December 2)
  • Cycle 3: Publishing Celebrations (February 27 – March 9)

Chapter 2: Mini-Lessons

  • Cycle 1: Meaningful Mini-Lessons (September 12 – September 23)
  • Cycle 2: Teaching Conventions in Mini-Lessons (December 5 – December 16)
  • Cycle 3: Making Our Teaching Stick (March 12 – March 23)

Chapter 3: Choice

  • Cycle 1: Physical Choices (September 26 – October 7)
  • Cycle 2: Moving Toward Independence (January 2 – January 13)
  • Cycle 3: Living the Life of a Writer (March 26 – April 13, no posts during Spring Break)

Chapter 4: Mentors

  • Cycle 1: Students as Mentors (October 10 – October 21)
  • Cycle 2: Teachers as Mentors (January 16 – January 27)
  • Cycle 3: Published Authors as Mentors (April 16 – April 27)

Chapter 5: Conferring

  • Cycle 1: Conferring Basics (October 24 – November 4)
  • Cycle 2: Peer Conferring (January 20 – February 10)
  • Cycle 3: Lifting the Level of our Conferences (April 30 – May 11)

Chapter 6: Assessment

  • Cycle 1: Formative Assessment (November 7 – November 18)
  • Cycle 2: Summative Assessment (February 13 – February 24)
  • Cycle 3: Standardized Tests (May 14 – May 25)